EDISON BLOG

Archive: May 2017

Why You Should Get Mover’s Insurance


 
Moving costs can get pretty expensive. Some people prefer to load the truck themselves, others prefer to leave it in the hands of professionals. When you finally secure a move-out date and you’re calling to schedule the appointment for the movers to arrive, be sure to keep these things in mind when deciding to accept or decline mover’s insurance:
 
  • Beware of “Mover’s Liability”: This is not insurance. Most moving companies will offer 60-cents on the pound if they are at fault for the damage.  This is standard coverage which movers are required to have, but think about it carefully. If your movers destroy your $2,000 couch which weighs 350 pounds, it means they are only required to pay you $250 in total if you can prove they are at fault.
 
  • Mover’s Insurance through the moving company: If you are taking this route, be sure the policy benefits you and not just them. They will be required to send you a copy of the policy and any other evidence sufficient enough to prove the insurance was purchased by you.
 
  • Personal mover’s insurance: Start by choosing the company of your liking. You’ll know exactly what you’re getting and how you will be protected.
 
  • Claims: If there are any disputes during the moving process, you will have to file a written claim with the mover within a certain time-frame of the delivery date. Provide as much information as you can so the company can fully investigate your claim, such as an accurate description of what happened along with multiple photographs.
 
  • Listen carefully: Most of the time, when you call to schedule these appointments, the person on the phone will be a fast-talker, due to so much information needing to be relayed. Be sure to ask any questions you may have and make sure they are answered completely before you make your deposit. It also helps to have something sent to you in writing so you can go over it on your own and spot anything you may have missed. Some people are more focused on getting their preferred moving date, and they wind up in a hurry to make a deposit. This is something on which you should really take your time.
 
  • Take photos of everything: This is the most important task before the movers arrive. Make sure you take timestamped photos of everything the movers will be taking with them on the morning of the move. Once you have these photos, store them in a safe place and if you notice any damage afterwards, you will be able to prove what the condition of the item was before the move.
 
Getting mover’s insurance will definitely cost you more for your move, but you must remember, the movers are human, just like you. Things may drop, get scratched or dented and you should be prepared for anything to happen. If you are insured, then a drop, bump or scratch won’t give you such a headache. Happy moving.


Thank you for visiting our blog. Hopefully, you came away with some great home insurance and safety tips. Edison Insurance Company’s mission is to provide quality coverage at competitive rates while providing exceptional service.  For more information on Florida homeowners insurance or to get a quote, please call (866) 568-8922.
 

Diving into Danger


 
Fact: Very few people know they can break their neck and/or suffer spinal cord injury from diving into water five feet or less. Many people know they can hit the bottom, and have done so, but most have never suffered injury. (Source: http://www.aquaticisf.org/diving.htm)
 
Experiencing such a devastating and irreversible injury is something most people think will never happen to them, until it does. "Shallow" water is considered to be anything from 18 inches to four feet. Very few recreational swimmers consider a depth of five feet to be shallow water. If you think about it, five feet is the approximate average height of an adult male and female (5’10 and 5’4, respectively). Now, think about diving head first into this amount of water.
 
According to the AANS (American Association of Neurological Surgeons), an estimated 11,000 spinal cord injuries occur in the United States each year. Males suffer 81.2 percent of these injuries. Diving is the fourth leading cause of spinal cord injury among males, and the fifth leading cause among females.
 
Here are some precautions you can take before diving into an unknown body of water:
 
  1. When entering an unknown body of water, dive feet first to check the depth and avoid injury. You should never dive a body of water without knowing how deep it is. Watch this video by Neurosurgeon, Kimberly Walpert for more information on why this is so important.
 
  1. When checking the depth of the water, make sure it is deep enough for diving. The distance to the bottom of the water should be double the distance from which you're diving. For example: if the diving board is 4 feet high, the water should be a minimum of 8 feet.
 
  1. Never dive into a lake or ocean, where sand bars or objects below the surface are not visible.
 
  1. Never dive into an above-ground pool. They are simply too shallow and not intended for diving.
 
Please take these suggestions into consideration in order to make this summer as safe and enjoyable as possible. Happy swimming!



Thank you for visiting our blog. Hopefully, you came away with some great home insurance and safety tips. Edison Insurance Company’s mission is to provide quality coverage at competitive rates while providing exceptional service.  For more information on Florida home insurance or to get a quote, please call (866) 568-8922.

What You Need to Know About Dry Drowning


 
As summer approaches, it is important to understand what dry drowning is, how to prevent it, and what the signs are. The term “dry drowning” can be a bit confusing since it can seem impossible to drown on dry land. Dry drowning, or secondary drowning, is a buildup of fluid in the lungs which does not occur during submersion in water. It can occur up to 24 hours after swimming.
 
Just because your child is out of the water, does not mean he/she is out of the safe zone. Dry drowning can be difficult to identify, but thankfully there are clear warning signs. All you need to do is look out for these red flags:
 
  • Distressful breathing / Consistent coughing:
Even if they seem fine, any child pulled from the pool because of a near-drowning episode needs medical attention to make sure their lungs are clear, or at least a call to the pediatrician. If your child is old enough, asking them how they are feeling can help you to better evaluate the situation.
 
  • Extreme/Unusual sleepiness:
It is not unusual for a child to be a little sleepy after a day at the pool or beach, but it is very important to keep a close eye on them.
 
  • Unusual behavior:
If you notice your child is unusually forgetful or “woozy”, you should make a call to the doctor right away, or seek medical attention, even if it has been hours after swimming. At this point, it is unlikely their symptoms will just disappear.
 
  • Vomiting:
Vomiting can indicate a lack of oxygen or inflammation. It could also be the result of persistent coughing and gagging as listed above.
 
If you notice any of these signs, your child’s pediatrician should be able to talk you through it or advise you to bring him/her in for further examination. Treatment includes checking the child’s vital signs, oxygen level and work of breathing (measuring the energy it takes for them to inhale and exhale). In the case your child is not able to breathe on his/her own, which is extremely rare, further support may be needed such as ventilation or intubating. The end goal is to make sure your child is breathing well and to increase blood flow to the lungs.
 
There are many ways to prevent dry drowning, such as swimming lessons to teach your child how to properly move through the water and hold their breath appropriately. Monitoring your children and making sure they have flotation devices, if necessary, is also a great idea. At young ages, your children need supervision at all times, even if they are excellent swimmers. Anything can happen, and it is always better to be safe than sorry.


Edison Insurance Company’s mission is to provide quality coverage at competitive rates while providing exceptional service.  For more information on Florida home insurance or to get a quote, please call (866) 568-8922.

Quick Tips for Kids: Pool Safety


 
May is National Drowning Prevention Month, which is meant to promote water and aquatic safety, drowning prevention and recreational activity safety. As summer approaches, it is important to evaluate your children’s swimming skills and know what steps to take when it comes to water safety.  You should know their strengths, weaknesses, and areas they may need help in when it comes to swimming.
 
Here are some facts from the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) on drowning.
 
  • From 2005-2014, there were an average of 3,536 fatal unintentional drownings (non-boating related) annually in the United States — about ten deaths per day. An additional 332 people died each year from drowning in boating-related incidents.
 
  • About one in five people who die from drowning are children 14 and younger. For every child who dies from drowning, another five receive emergency care for nonfatal submersion injuries.
 
  • More than 50% of drowning victims treated in emergency departments (EDs) require hospitalization or transfer for further care (compared with a hospitalization rate of about 6% for all unintentional injuries). These nonfatal drowning injuries can cause severe brain damage which may result in long-term disabilities such as memory problems, learning disabilities, and permanent loss of basic functioning (e.g., permanent vegetative state).
 
Here are some things you can do to avoid a tragedy:
 
  • Supervise children at all times when in or out of the pool. Even if your children are playing around the pool, they still need your undivided attention in case of a slip or fall.
 
  • Be prepared for an emergency. CPR classes are available year-round. It’s simple, all you need to do is search online for a class near you. Learning basic rescue skills could save your child’s life, or even someone else’s. Although the ambulance is called, it does not necessarily mean it can wait. Many rescues are successful because of someone using CPR until the ambulance arrives.
 
  • Teach your children how to swim. Of course, they may not be professional swimmers right away, but enrolling them in swimming lessons could be a game-changer. Should they ever find themselves in trouble, they could apply those skills in a calm manner to get themselves out (or at least hang on until help arrives). Basic skills such as treading water and floating are a must, if they are to be trusted in the water without a floatation device or other assistance.
 
  • Clear toys from the pool after swimming. Smaller children are more likely to follow a ball or toy straight into the pool. Some will even try so hard to reach their toys, they end up falling in unintentionally. If no one is around to help, or witness, there could be a fatal result. It is important to bring all toys inside to avoid temptation.
 
  • Make it clear to your children: Needing help isn’t embarrassing! Some children may be tempted to remove their floatation devices because the other children in the pool are without it. If your child is very hesitant to wear their life jacket and they know the basics of swimming (as listed above), try an alternative, like a pool noodle, boogie board or floating ring they can hold onto while strengthening their swimming. You will need to keep a very close eye on them, but at least it will encourage them to become stronger, instead of ditching the floating devices completely.
 
We hope you will keep these safety tips in mind when your children are ready to take their first dip in the pool this summer. For more information, visit https://www.safekids.org/poolsafety.


Thank you for visiting our blog. Hopefully, you came away with some great home insurance and safety tips. Edison Insurance Company’s mission is to provide quality coverage at competitive rates while providing exceptional service.  For more information on Florida homeowners insurance or to get a quote, please call (866) 568-8922.